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We got a chance to ask William Wires, an ever progressing painter, our eight Berlin questions. William has a show coming up on September 7 at 2pm through September 8 at 8pm at LEKKERURLAUB notaufnahme (Graefestrasse 89, 10967), so if he intrigues and enraptures you with his answers below, check out the event page here.

1. In one sentence – and we mean one sentence – what is it you do?

Occupationally, I’ve been painting oils and watercolors on location in urban settings during the last decade.

2. Why are you doing it in Berlin?

Well, I’ve been resident in Berlin for thirty years, which is more than half my life. It was adventure and coincidence that brought me here in the first place. Of course, I made the decision to stay.

3. What’s the best thing about doing it in Berlin?

With my painting I’ve made the big city along with its contradictions a part of my life. It is strenuous and inspiring at the same time. In Berlin, I latched onto the different Kiez (neighborhood) cultures.

4. What’s the worst thing about doing it in Berlin?

Although cars and trucks are a reality in the city, I usually leave them out of my paintings, because usually being in the foreground, they dominate the picture composition. And they block my view at street level.

5. Your favorite place for lunch is…

I’ve painted many oils and watercolors of gastronomic establishments and don’t think it’s wise to promote specific ones. Also, painting at different locations doesn’t allow me to maintain a Stammlokal (regular hangout). Enjoying a tasty lunch at the place I’ve chosen does take a lot of valuable time away from painting. Light and shadow don’t wait for me to finish eating. And then there’s the cliché of the starving artist…

6. If you had to leave Berlin within two hours knowing that you could never come back what would you do in that time?

Well, in that case, even three hours would mean the same thing. Of course, I’d take my family with me. Artistically, I’d be anticipating a new location and its challenges.

7. Would you consider yourself an artist?

On the street, people ask me if I’m a professional or a hobby painter. I could answer that I’m a baker or an investor in my own self-defined work. Interactions in public while painting rehash that question continually. So, not being elusive: yes, I am an artist.

8. The last thing you have to say is:

What, my dying words?! No, I know what you mean. I’ve been fortunate in being able to not have a job and be autonomous in my work. A more social society can be achieved if people are allowed – or dare – to realize their own capabilities and do what makes them happy.

If you want to know a little more about William, don’t forget to visit his Facebook and his Art Kreuzberg page.